Letter Worksheets

Letter worksheets are a great learning aid that parents and teachers can use to help preschool and kindergarten children learn to recognise letters, the sounds letters make and some of the sounds that they make with certain words.

Types of letter worksheets

Tracing Letter Worksheets – these worksheets are great for providing your child practice with writing different letters. Each worksheet contains three rows of letters that your child can trace. Worksheets are available in lower and upper case.

Letter Sound Worksheets – this worksheet gives your child an introduction to the most basic sound that a letter makes. This worksheet also has a row of upper case and lower case letters that your child can trace.

Special Letter Sound Worksheets – these worksheets are great for helping your child identify and recognise the special sounds that some letters make that are different to the phonics sound a letter produces.

Letter A – The first letter of the alphabet. Select from 7 worksheets.

Letter B – Did you know that the letter b makes the ‘b is for bat’ sound almost all the time. Select from 5 worksheets.

Letter C – C is one of the first letters children learn. However it is a tricky letter to learn with many different pronunciation rules. Select from 6 worksheets.

Letter D – Many kids mix up ‘d’ and ‘b’ when they are learning to write. Select from 4 worksheets.

Letter E – The letter ‘e’ is the most common letter in the English language. Select from 6 worksheets.

Letter F – The letter f is one of the easier lettersin the English language as it almost always makes the ‘f is for fish’ sound. Select from 5 worksheets.

Letter G – G can be a tricky letter as it makes the ‘g is for gorilla’ sound but commonly makes the ‘g is for giraffe’ sound. Select from 6 worksheets.

Letter H – Generally the letter h can be relied on to make the ‘H is for hat’ sound. Select from 4 worksheets.

Letter I – The letter i is the fifth most commonly used letter in English. Select from 4 worksheets.

Letter J – Only the letters ‘q’, ‘x’ and ‘z’ are less commonly used than the letter j. Select from 4 worksheets.

Letter K – ‘K if for king’ but sometimes it is silent as in ‘knife’. Select from 4 worksheets.

Letter L – The ‘L is for lion’ sound is quite consistent for the letter l, but it too can be silent as in the word ‘walk’. Select from 4 worksheets.

Letter M – One of the easiest letters, it is rarely silent and doesn’t combine with other letters to make unusual sounds. Select from 4 worksheets.

Letter N – ‘N’ is a wonderful letter! It is the second most used consonant in English (after ‘T’) and can almost always be relied upon to be pronounced with an ‘n is for night’ sound. Select from 4 worksheets.

Letter O – ‘O’ is the fourth most commonly used letter in English. In addition to the basic ‘o’ sound in ‘hot’, there are a number of other common sounds that ‘o’ makes, including the long ‘o’ in ‘bone’, the double ‘o’ sound in ‘food’ and the double ‘o’ sound in ‘good’ and the ‘oi’ sound in ‘coin’. Select from 7 worksheets.

7 worksheets.

Letter P – The letter ‘p’ generally can be relied upon to be pronounced in its usual ‘p is for pig’ fashion. The main exception to this is when it is paired with an ‘h’ to form an ‘f’ sound, such as in ‘phone’ and ‘photo’. Select from 6 worksheets.

Letter Q – The letter ‘q’ almost always appears in front of a ‘u’ and is usually pronounced with a ‘kw’ sound. On rare occasions it is pronounced with a ‘k’ sound – for example in ‘quay’ and ‘plaque’ or a ‘ky’ sound – as in ‘queue’. Select from 4 worksheets.

Letter R – The letter ‘r’ is the fifth most commonly used consonant in English and forms part of many consonant blends – for example the ‘br’ sound in ‘bring’ and the ‘fr’ sound in ‘free’. Select from 4 worksheets.

Letter S – The letter ‘s’ is one of the most important letters in the alphabet. When the letter ‘s’ joins with ‘h’ to make the key ‘sh’ sound. The addition of an ‘s’ at the end of a word is the most common way to form a plural. Select from 10 worksheets.

Letter T – The letter ‘t’ is one of the most important in English. After ‘e’ it is the most commonly used letter – almost one out of every ten letters in English usage is a ‘t’. Select from 5 worksheets.

Letter U – The letter ‘u’ is by far the least frequently used vowel in English and only the 13th most commonly used of all letters. In different words it can be pronounced quite a few different ways, with the most common being the ‘u’ is for ‘up’ sound and the ‘oo’ sound heard in ‘June’. Select from 5 worksheets.

Letter V – In a language in which so many letters have variable pronunciations, letter v is a nice exception: it consistently makes the ‘v is for van’ sound. Select from 4 worksheets.

Letter W – The typical sound made by ‘w’, as heard in ‘west’ is simple enough – but ‘w’ is quite a tricky letter to read as it appears quite often as a silent letter and/or can cause a change in the way that a vowel coming before it is pronounced. Select from 4 worksheets.

Letter X – Most commonly, ‘x’ is pronounced with the ‘ks’ sound heard at the end of ‘box’. However, it can also be pronounced with a ‘gz’ sound, as in ‘exact’, and, when heard at the start of words it usually has a ‘z’ sound’ as in ‘xylophone’. Select from 4 worksheets.

Letter Y – ‘Y’ is officially classed as a consonant – and acts as a consonant whenever it is pronounced with a ‘y is for yellow’ sound. However, it also acts as a vowel – for example in the word ‘baby’ it has a long ‘e’ sound, and in ‘my’ it has a long ‘i’ sound. Select from 6 worksheets.

Letter Z – The final letter of the alphabet is also the least used. ‘Z’ can almost always be relied upon to be pronounced with a ‘z is for zoo’ sound. Select from 4 worksheets.

Using Worksheets

Your most important job is to ensure your child associates reading with fun and working through a series of worksheets will most likely have the opposite effect.

Instead, we suggest you pick and choose a worksheet when the time is right.

For example, your child might be confident at sounding out simple words such as ‘sat’ and ‘cat’, but might be struggling with words like ‘cake’ and ‘plate’.

In this instance, the ‘Long a’ sound worksheet would be ideal to help you teach your child the different sound ‘a’ makes when it is followed by a consonant and then an e.

Once your child has mastered each of the reading worksheets make sure you spend time reading some new books with them – ideally books which will give them an opportunity to practice their new skill.

Alphabet Resources

Alphabet Chart – the alphabet chart consists of all the letters with a picture corresponding to the phonic sound they make. The chart is a great tool to teach the alphabet to your child.

Alphabet Songs – try using these alphabet songs that we’ve compiled that are freely available on youtube.

Letter Songs – select from our letter songs on the Guruparents YouTube channel.

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